Plickers

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A free (to an extent) online app, Plickers is a tried and true way to run quizzes and questions in classrooms where wi-fi is unreliable, equity is a concern, or devices pose a safety hazard. It relies on using printed QR codes, and the teacher’s device as a scanner.

Students QR cards, marked with A, B, C, or D on each edge. The instructor asks a multiple choice question (or True or False), and the students hold the corresponding side up to the ceiling. The instructor scans their answers with their phone, and gets an instant read on who is correct or incorrect. They can also display the results on a classroom screen, much like a PowerPoint, for students to check their own learning.

Get Started

Start out by creating a free account at Plickers.com. Use a school email and an easy to remember password. If you ever forget your password, just click the Forgot Password link.

Once Plickers opens, it will give you a tutorial on how to get set up for using the app.

Follow each of the items on the checklist to get ready to run a Plickers session.

Test it out by printing off the scanner cards and trying out scanning them. Experiment with how accurately the scanner picks them up.

Tips

Plickers is delivered using a presentation screen and your phone or tablet as a scanner. It’s best suited to collect information live in class or in the shop, when you might otherwise ask students to call out answers, or “raise their hand if…”

Start with something simple. Try a 5 question quiz to check students’ understanding of a concept. Students instantly see how they did, and compare their understanding to their peers. It also allows you to add images and diagrams, and works like a PowerPoint substitute.

Consider laminating the Plickers cards. This will make them last longer, and if anything fails, students can use the back of the paper like a whiteboard.

This is a formative assessment tool. It lets students check their own learning. The Scoresheet area lets you collect reports about individual student performance, and associate this with a grade value.


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  • Published: July 4, 2019
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  • Reading time: ~ 2 minutes
  • Rights: Creative Commons CC-BY Attribution License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons CC-BY Attribution 4.0 International License.
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Jess Wilkinson

Jesslyn is the Educational Technology Officer at Conestoga. An Ontario Certified Teacher, and holding a B.A. and B.Ed., Jesslyn researches and promotes new technologies for faculty to enhance pedagogical practices. She brings to the role her experience as a Google and Microsoft certified technology trainer and as a classroom teacher in South Korea, Mongolia, and Ontario, focusing on special education and assistive learning technologies. She is available for workshops, consultations, and support with using technology in higher education contexts.

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